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Blood of Flowers, 2016
Gabryel Harrison
Oil on canvas
43 X 43 in.

Gabryel Harrison
Poems for the Earth
November 9 - December 7, 2013

November 9 - December 7, 2013, Winsor Gallery is pleased to present POEMS FOR THE EARTH, an exhibition of new floral and landscape paintings by Gabryel Harrison.











Blood of Flowers, 2016
Gabryel Harrison
Oil on canvas
43 X 43 in.

Gabryel Harrison
Things Remembered From My Time On Earth
November 1 - December 2, 2014

Winsor Gallery is pleased to present new works by Gabryel Harrison.



Blood of Flowers, 2016
Gabryel Harrison
Oil on canvas
43 X 43 in.

Gabryel Harrison
The Arc of Our Disappearance
May 28th- June 30th, 2016

Winsor Gallery is pleased to announce a solo exhibition of new works by Gabryel Harrison. The exhibition entitled The Arc of Our Disappearance will run from May 28th through June 25th, 2016. An opening reception will be held on Saturday, May 28th, between 2 and 4 pm. The Artist will be in attendance.

Artist Statement

“Every flower has its own cosmology, its own relationship to the foliage, to the air around it”.
-Jane Freilicher

And every flower is perishable. Each one of our lives but a brief flowering. All that we are and
all that we love, part of a great current. a beautiful passing stream of ever vanishing stabilities.
These paintings look at our passing. I consider the full life cycle of the flower as a reflection of
our own temporality. We are born, we bloom we fade, we die and disappear from this world.
My paintings are reflections on the arc of this natural and beautiful passage. Using oil sticks, paint and beeswax, scratches, scumbles and slung paint, I am inspired by intuition as much as intellect. I celebrate accident, inviting drips and smudges to evoke both decay and effulgence. I encourage a feeling of the sensual and visceral with painterly abstraction, balancing loose gestural brushstrokes with more realistic passages in painting form and void, flower and ground. Like the Japanese phrase mono no aware, meaning “beauty tinged with sadness, I paint the flower and the death in the flower. I offer these paintings in the midst of a world comprised of ever increasing speed and volatility, as possibilities of quiet reflection on what it means to be alive and mortal.

Meditating on the ordinary subject of flowers, I can say as John Cage said of the flower paintings of Morris Graves, “…To the self-destructive inventions of civilization they are the replies of nature”.